Comments of the Week (Week ending 18/11/2012)

It’s come to the end of our very first week at Beyond Hallyu and we want to thank you all for making it such a successful week and for showing us your support! We hope we brought you some interesting topics

This week we’ve covered lots of different subjects from K-pop scandals to North Korea to the London Korean Film Festival to the new Madame Tussauds opening in Busan. We’ve also reviewed lots of films and given you recommendations for some great music to check out.

Lots of our articles sparked some really interesting debate in the comments and we want to highlight some of our favourite. So, without any further from me, onto the comments:

 

On Discovering Korean perceptions of beauty in Seoul

Jacqueline

I find this terribly troubling. Asian people are THE most beautiful in the world in my opinion. Yet, I find it sick and sad to constantly hear about Koreans needing to be perfect as if there is something wrong with them to begin with. Who started this? Why is this mentality present there? There are so many naturally beautiful there and the teenage girls aren’t finished developing and get plastic surgery to change themselves before they know what they will look. Don’t they know that plastic surgery doesn’t change what’s inside or even how future children they bear will look. Beauty isn’t on the outside. It’s on the inside. I’ve spent my whole life being called ugly and yet there’s beauty within me. I wish they could see that for themselves instead of chasing it with plastic surgery. How sad.

Theorist

What sucks that… it has become a part of a sick culture. The need to become perfect by the “standards” that have been set by the society. This is unhealthy, one can have surgery, sure that’s their choice. But having to need one is something to worry about. Have you watch the video, a documentary by the Vice on youtube? Scary but ignorant at some points but it clearly shows the first impression.

If you want to check out this documentary, you can see it here.

 

On The Guardian writes about K-pop yet again, readers are not impressed

Geraldine

…For a country that is supposed to be quite open minded and international, who’d have thought that there would be an issue with foreign language songs and culture introducing themselves into “our” market? I guess it must be partly to do with the fact that East Asia has tended to keep itself to itself for the past hundreds of years or so, and we’ve had such a great time colonising people and forcing our language and culture on them we’ve seemed to miss the fact that we didn’t consume the entire world and that the world still remains full of language and culture. What I think is upsetting is the fact that they must release an album in English that they must conform to our language and be accepted by our society in order to succeed; to disguise their korean ethnicity with white masks while also heavily emphasising their manufacturedness. …

Jackie via our Facebook Page

Personally I wish the indie bands etc were promoted as I am getting work colleagues to listen to various genres of Korean music and showing them that PSY is not the type of music I listen to. ( no issue with it but its like comparing the birds song to oasis ) Do not get me wrong I love lots of Kpop groups but Korean music and traditional music has so much more to offer the masses than PSY

On Scintillatingly Scandalous: IU, Eunhyuk and Dating on the Kpop Scene

Gareth

I thought this article was very interesting, suggesting that perhaps the international and Korean reactions are quite different,
http://seoulbeats.com/2012/11/iu-eunhyuk-and-the-imaginary-korean-netizen-backlash/

Sandra via our Facebook page

So… what’s the big deal in all this? They’re persons and they should do whatever they want with their private life, that’s why it’s called “private”.
What made me laugh was this: “Many fans have been disheartened by this, crying out disapproval at being deceived and having their hearts broken”. Seriously?

IU’s got an innocent and cute image, same as Suzy (miss A), but it doesn’t mean they actually are. It’s just a commercial image and people should grow up a little before making a drama with all this.
Sometimes I think that celebrities are more down-to-Earth than most of their fans.

On Behind the Scenes, Our Favourite People in Kpop: Kim Eana, lyricist

Tobi

Kim Eana is truly inspirational, as well as the artists which she works with, I’m glad she only works with artists she believes in & doesn’t sell herself out to just anybody.
She is a true revolutionary, & so beautiful might I just add ^^。

Please continue to add you thoughts in the comments so we can create an even more interesting and diverse discussion and perhaps we will even spotlight your ideas in this feature.

Thanks again for reading and supporting Beyond Hallyu and let us know your thoughts on any of this week’s topic in the comments.